Month: December 2014

Baby sleep safety reminder for Essex

The Essex Safeguarding Children Board (ESCB) has issued a baby sleep safety reminder to parents after infant sleeping conditions were found to have been a factor in a number of recent deaths. The board’s Safer Sleep for Babies campaign aims to raise awareness of dangerous sleeping environments and offers advice on the correct positioning and surfaces to prevent further tragedies. Their advice is particularly relevant over the festive season when families may have different sleeping arrangements and babies could be being cared for by other people. Simon Hart, ESCB chairman, said: “Christmas is a time many people want to...

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Are you ringing in the New Year with plans for a baby?

Are you planning on having a baby in 2015? Is starting a family the ultimate New Year’s resolution for you and your partner? If so, preparing your body for pregnancy with a post-Christmas detox could be the key to successful conception. Read more in our article by guest blogger Neema Savvides.   Prepare your body for pregnancy with some lifestyle changes.   Are you planning on having a baby in 2014? Is starting a family the ultimate New Year’s resolution for you and your partner? If so, preparing your body for pregnancy with a post-Christmas detox could be the...

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Coping with Pregnancy Envy

When trying for a baby and yet another close friend announces their pregnancy, it is very difficult not to feel a little jealous. Pregnancy envy is a very difficult topic to discuss, often recognized, but not necessarily acknowledged for the very real emotion it is. Why does this happen? The time is right, your relationship is ready for the next step, the spare room is empty, finances are in place and the decision to have a baby has been made. Filled with excitement and optimism you embark on your journey. For many, when nature’s response is slower than anticipated,...

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Fewer women dying in childbirth

The number women in the UK dying during or after childbirth has dropped, a report has found. The report, Saving Lives, Improving Mothers’ Care, led by Oxford University’s National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, found that maternal deaths have fallen from 11 per 100,000 in 2006-08 down to 10 per 100,000 in 2010-12. Two thirds of these deaths were as a result of medical and mental health problems in pregnancy, rather than direct complications such as bleeding. Of the 321 women who died from conditions caused or exacerbated by their pregnancies, nearly three quarters were suffered from pre-existing medical conditions. The Royal College of Midwives’ director for midwifery, Louise Silverton, said: “We welcome this long-awaited report and the drop in maternal deaths due to pregnancy complications, such as eclampsia, blood loss or blood clots. “However, we remain concerned about the high level of deaths amongst women with pre-existing medical conditions, such as a cardiac or neurological conditions. “We need to break down communication barriers and ensure translation services are readily available for women not fluent in English. We also need more midwives and maternity support workers to deal with the increasing complexity of pregnancy and better teamwork with doctors to provide seamless maternity care … The NHS needs to do more to prioritise these women’s care in its already overstretched maternity services.” But the authors of the report claim that even...

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‘Mother’s intuition’ catches deadly heart defect

The mother of one of Essex’s top long distance runners has caught her son’s potentially fatal heart defect using ‘mother’s intuition.’ Joe Patterson, 15, has been running competitively for two years and competes for Colchester and Tendring Athletics Club (CAT). Although his health and fitness had never been brought into question, his mum, Jacqui Patterson-McGrath, insisted he go for a check-up. When paediatric doctors ran an ECG scan, they discovered that Joe was suffering from Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome (WPW), a condition that can be deadly if left untreated. “I had a gut feeling that something wasn’t right with Joe,” told reported James Cox. “No one wants to hear their child has a heart condition but what’s the alternative? You hear about sudden death in sportsmen more and more, marathon runners dropping down on the finish line. Then we had Fabrice Muamba, a Premier League footballer, who had to be revived on the pitch because his condition wasn’t picked up. “Joe’s always training hard so his heart is under stress so I pushed for him to get checked.” The condition can cause symptoms such as chest pains, palpitations, racing pulse and breathing difficulties, but Joe had experienced no serious signs. “We didn’t know anything about this,” says Jacqui. “He had the off palpitation but they always went quickly and we put the down to over exertion, easily missed. Know we know...

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